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5 TED Talks that inspired me

A. Simon Sinek: "How great leaders inspire action"

My introduction to TED Talks started with this video of Simon Sinek - is it any wonder that I was hooked on since then!

Simon Sinek has a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership — starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?" I catch myself watching this video every few months, just so that I don’t loose sight of the “Why”.


B. Sheryl Sandberg: “Why we have too few women leaders”

I have never met her, but I consider her a mentor. At TEDWomen in 2010 Sandberg made the bold decision to talk about the experience of being one of very few women at the C-level of business. She noted that many women, in anticipating having a family, "lean back" from leading at work. After her TED Talk took off, Sandberg wrote the book Lean In, which has spent nearly a year on the New York TimesBestseller list. Sandberg plans to release a version of the book for graduates.

c. Richard St John talks: “8 Secrets of Success”

Richard St. John was on his way to the TED conference when a girl on the plane asked him, "What really leads to success?" Even though he had achieved some success, he couldn't explain how he did it. So he spent the next ten years researching success and asking over 500 extraordinarily successful people in many fields what helped them succeed. After analyzing, sorting, and correlating millions of words of research, and building one of the most organized databases on the subject of success, he discovered "The 8 Traits Successful People Have in Common" and wrote the bestseller 8 To Be Great.

D. Malcolm Gladwell: "The unheard story of David and Goliath"

It's a classic underdog tale: David, a young shepherd armed only with a sling, beats Goliath, the mighty warrior. The story has transcended its biblical origins to become a common shorthand for unlikely victory. But, asks Malcolm Gladwell, is that really what the David and Goliath story is about?

E. Angela Lee Duckworth: "The key to success? Grit

Leaving a high-flying job in consulting, Angela Lee Duckworth took a job teaching math to seventh graders in a New York public school. She quickly realized that IQ wasn’t the only thing separating the successful students from those who struggled. Here, she explains her theory of “grit” as a predictor of success.

(List compiled by Ruby Peethambaran, Co-founder of Fourth Ambit)

 

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